Ask Your Doctor About MRI-Compatible Pacemakers

Ask Your Doctor About MRI-Compatible Pacemakers

The use of pacemakers has increased dramatically in recent years, partly due to our aging society. An estimated 75 percent of patients who have an implantable cardiac electronic device, such as a pacemaker, will need magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during their lifetime, according to the Mayo Clinic. However, many types of pacemakers can be risky to use in an MRI, which uses a large magnet and radio waves to produce clear, accurate images of...

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Staging and Next Steps

Staging and Next Steps

At Busch Center, we understand that being diagnosed with prostate cancer can be scary and overwhelming.  We work with each patient – and their loved ones – to explain every step of their journey, answer their questions, and provide personalized, compassionate care. Once a patient is diagnosed with prostate cancer, one of our first steps is to “stage” it to determine whether it’s considered low, intermediate or high-grade cancer.  We...

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Let’s Talk About TULSA – An Effective Treatment Option for Prostate Cancer

Let’s Talk About TULSA – An Effective Treatment Option for Prostate Cancer

In less than five years, prostate patients were coming to me from all over the U.S. and outside of the U.S. to have their prostates scanned. Studies have shown that 70% to 80% of men with an elevated PSA, or prostate-specific antigen, who have a biopsy do not have cancer. I am the first interventional radiologist in America to adopt TULSA-PRO and our practice is the second in the country to introduce it. Read more in my interview with...

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Cruciferous Vegetables and Your Prostate Health

Cruciferous Vegetables and Your Prostate Health

Did you know compounds in cruciferous vegetables, like broccoli and cauliflower, may target and inhibit prostate cancer cells in the body? Unlike other vegetables and plant foods, cruciferous vegetables are rich sources of glucosinolates, sulfur-containing compounds that cause their strong scent and somewhat bitter taste.  Researchers are especially interested in sulforaphane, a specific compound in...

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Journal of Urology PSA Article

Journal of Urology PSA Article

A recent article from the Journal of Urology found the use of PSA density less than 0.15 ng/ml/ml in the presence of prebiopsy negative MRI was the most useful factor to identify men without clinically significant prostate cancer who could avoid biopsy.  Learn more here.

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Dr. Busch Speaks with Atlanta Business RadioX

Dr. Busch Speaks with Atlanta Business RadioX

Atlanta Business RadioX Interview with Dr. Joe Busch Listen as Dr. Busch talks with Lee Cantor from Atlanta Business RadioX about how the three most common methods to detect prostate cancer are fraught with problems and errors. In the U.S., medical teams typically use either prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood tests, blind needle biopsies, or digital rectal exams to determine whether a man has prostate cancer. Dr. Busch says these methods are...

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Busch Center Uses the Safest, Most Stable Contrast Dye and Only When Necessary

Busch Center Uses the Safest, Most Stable Contrast Dye and Only When Necessary

At Busch Center, many of our scans and screenings are done with noneedles, contrast dye, or radiation for a more comfortable patient experience.  In some cases, however, our magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans require us to use contrast agents to get a more robust view to see if (and where) cancer is located in the body. In the cases where contrast dye is necessary, we opt to use Dotarem because it’s the best, safest, most stable, and...

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Agent Orange: Likely a Prostate Cancer Risk Factor

Agent Orange: Likely a Prostate Cancer Risk Factor

Research shows that exposure to Agent Orange, an herbicide frequently used during the Vietnam War, likely caused an aggressive form of prostate cancer in many Vietnam veterans. The U.S. military used significant amounts of Agent Orange, which was contaminated with dioxin, a dangerous toxin that is now believed to cause cancer, to spray on trees and other vegetation. Soldiers who served in Vietnam between 1962-1975 were likely exposed to this...

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Medical Studies

Personalized Treatment for Patients with Prostate Cancer Using MRI-guided Transurethral Ultrasound Ablation (TULSA)

MAGNETOM Flash
TULSA is a new technology which has demonstrated promising early oncological results with a well-tolerated safety profile. As Prostate Cancer disease localization continues to improve, it is expected that targeted treatment will become increasingly part of localized Prostate Cancer management. As MRI is already embedded within TULSA, used both to guide, plan, and monitor treatment, TULSA is well-positioned to address the changing landscape of Prostate Cancer disease management.

Palliative MRI-guided Transurethral Ultrasound Ablation for Symptomatic Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer

Scandinavian Journal of Urology
The study concludes TULSA appears safe and feasible for palliative ablation of locally advanced prostate cancer. The therapy seems to accomplish long-term hematuria control, can relieve bladder outlet obstruction in selected patients, and seems to reduce the burden of hospitalization due to local complications.

MRI-Guided Transurethral Ultrasound Ablation for BPH

Journal of Endourology
This retrospective analysis demonstrates promising safety and feasibility of TULSA to relieve LUTS, with improvements in IPSS comparable to modern minimally invasive surgical therapies. Larger controlled studies with BPH-specific ablation plans in men seeking treatment for LUTS are warranted.

Patient Testimonials

Elevated PSA Levels

Busch Center Experience

America’s Flawed Standard of Care

Importance of Early Detection Through Screening

About Prostate MRI Screening

Treating Prostate Cancer

TULSA Procedure